Tag Archives: Snapmaker

Laser TIME

Finally took some time to play with the SnapMaker(SM) laser module. Got ahold of some 3.5mm birch plywood for a decent price and played around with that. When I say played around, I really mean “thought I could use the same settings as Basswood” NOPE! The birch is much denser and higher quality, so the same settings to cut regular “plywood for laser” weren’t quite strong enough.

Kudos to the folks at LightBurn for having software that’s fairly easy to learn. Their stuff made it fairly easy to tweak settings and get the next test up and running without too much hassle or screen switching. (HIGHLY recommend their software for laser gcode generation)

I also learned a lot about how the SM handles the work origin and laser focal height, which are KEY things when using 3rd party software with a device.

SM does provide a “Definitive Guide” on what settings to use for the SM1 and SM2 laser modules, but it doesn’t cover very much. I’ll be making my own tracking spreadsheet for reference and lessons learned.

The little things

While our Snapmaker 2.0 has been wonderful to use, it need to under extrude just a little bit. I decided to bite the bullet and try to perform an Extruder Calibration.

I followed the steps in this post on the Snapmaker forums, and it was pretty easy. About 15 min of marking, extruding and performing the math, and I found myself extruding at the proper rate. 100mm is now 100mm, and not 86 like it had been.

Now, with every 3D-Print change, there’s balancing that needs to happen. I had tweaked profile settings enough that my prints were turning out pretty good. Now they’re over-extruded. This is where the balancing comes into play. Now to figure out what to un-tweak./

First step is to make sure other hardware settings are correct. So I’ll be working on the Liner Advance first. With this turorial video and this Marlin documentation, I hope to make some progress soon.

Inversely, if I’d left things alone it’d be printing just fine for the most part…

Edit:

And on that note, after much testing, oddly enough, I was much better off. looks like having an accurate E-Step causes over extrusion. I’ve since gone back to the default 212.21 that it ships with.

Creative Upgrades

It”s finally here! For Christmas as a gift to ourselves, we decided to upgrade from our XYZ Davinci Jr. 2.0 Mix to a Snapmaker 2.0 A350.

The original printer we have is good, but it”s got a very small build area for some of the things I wanted to design and print. The color mix option is really cool. But it”s biggest faults are the NFC chipped filaments that are required for use, and the software to slice the prints.

The NFC chips are a neat idea, they pre-set the heating information and keep a loose track of how much filament is supposed to be on the spool. However, if you try to load filament that isn”t chipped, then it won”t print. You can just mount a pair of chips to it, after removing them from the spools, but then you have to deal with the persistent warnings that your spools “are most likely empty”.

We”ll still keep it around, but it”s time to upgrade.

Enter the Snapmaker 2.0 A350, a nice large 3-in-1. The build area on this thing is HUGE compared to what we had before. Assembly wasn”t too bad, leisurely got it into a running condition in about an hour.

The initial calibration took a few tries after the firmware upgrade, mostly because I”m used to dealing with a nozzle that”s a little larger. The nozzle on this is VERY fine.

Currently my first print is chirping away on the print bed as the actuators move everything around. Yes, it”s very very chirpy.

Looking forward to all the projects this new system will able to make happen!